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MY DAILY CHOICE BLOG

“SLEEP”

www.mydailychoice.com

Valerian Benefits

Valerian is well known for its sedative qualities and its ability to relax the central nervous system and the

smooth muscle groups. It has been used as a sleeping aid for hundreds of years especially when there is

excitation or difficulty in falling to sleep due to nervousness. Over 120 chemical components are found in

valerian and although a very complex herb, it has not been found to have any negative side effects with

moderate use.

It is calming without exerting too sedative an effect and is practically non-addictive. It is a valuable

treatment for insomnia, the sedative effect due to the valepotriates and the isovaleric acid.

At least two double-blind studies have demonstrated that valerian extract can significantly reduce the

amount of time it takes people to fall asleep without changing the normal stages of sleep.

Documented research has noted a mild hypnotic action in both normal sleepers and insomniacs, indicated

by a beneficial effect on sleep latency, wake-time after sleep, frequency of waking, nocturnal motor

activity, inner restlessness and tension and quality of sleep. Sleepiness and dream recall the morning after

were unaffected. The valepotriates have a regulatory effect on the autonomic nervous system; research

suggests that they have a calming effect on agitated people but are also a stimulant in cases of fatigue.

Valerian is used in Europe as an antispasmodic, particularly for abdominal cramps due to nervousness and

for uterine cramps and menstrual agitation. It helps relieve dysmenorrhoea and it can be of benefit in

migraine and rheumatic pain. It may also be applied locally as a treatment for cramps and other muscle

tensions.

Valerian is also used as a mild tranquilizer for people experiencing emotional stress, much as anti-anxiety

drugs are prescribed and has been prescribed for exhaustion. Valerian has occasionally been tried as part

of a program to take a patient off antidepressants or benzodiazepines, and is sometimes used as a muscle

relaxant to treat pain.

Valerian does not impair driving ability and produces no morning hangover effect. It is a gentle relaxant

and an effective sleep aid.

Millions of people have difficulty sleeping and the pharmaceutical industry has cashed in on the problem

to the tune of billions of dollars. But herbal sleep aids can be as effective as the powerful prescription

sedatives such as valium and other narcotic type drugs.

http://www.herbwisdom.com/herb-valerian.html

If you have any questions or concerns please email us at:

mydailychoiceasia@gmail.com

 MY DAILY CHOICE BLOG

“SLEEP”

www.mydailychoice.com

I read that the herbal supplement valerian can help you fall asleep if you have insomnia. Is valerian safe, and does it actually work?

Results from multiple studies indicate that valerian — a tall, flowering grassland plant — may reduce the amount of time it takes to fall asleep and help you sleep better. Of the many valerian species, only the carefully processed roots of the Valeriana officinalis have been widely studied. However, not all studies have shown valerian to be effective, and there may be some dangers.

Before you decide to take a valerian supplement for insomnia, consider the following:

Medication may not be the answer for insomnia. Cognitive behavioral therapy — for instance, replacing worries about not sleeping with positive thoughts — may be more effective and safer than medications for dealing with chronic insomnia. Or there may be important underlying causes, such as sleep apnea or periodic limb movement disorder, which require evaluation.

Product claims may be misleading. Don’t just rely on a product’s biased marketing. Look for objective, research-based information to evaluate a product’s claims, such as from the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) or the Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS). Both NCCIH and ODS are part of the National Institutes of Health.

Dosage is unclear. Valerian seems to be most effective after you take it regularly for two or more weeks. Because dosages varied in studies involving valerian and some studies weren’t rigorous, it’s not clear what dose is most effective or for how long you should take a particular dose.

Possible side effects exist. Although valerian is thought to be fairly safe, side effects such as headache, dizziness, stomach problems or sleeplessness may occur. Valerian may not be safe if you’re pregnant or breast-feeding. And it has not been evaluated to determine if it’s safe for children under 3 years old. If you have liver disease, avoid taking valerian. And because valerian can make you drowsy, avoid driving or operating dangerous machinery after taking it.

Drug interactions are possible. Valerian may increase the effects of other sleep aids. It also increases the sedative effect of depressants, such as alcohol, benzodiazepines and narcotics. Valerian can interfere with some prescription medications. And it may interact with other dietary supplements, such as St. John’s wort. If you’re thinking of taking valerian, check with your doctor to make sure it won’t interact with other medications or supplements you’re taking.

Ultimately, persistent insomnia indicates a problem, such as poor sleep habits or a medical or psychological condition. If you continue to have insomnia, talk to your doctor about possible causes and treatment strategies. Or, consider getting an evaluation at a sleep medicine center that’s accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/insomnia/expert-answers/valerian/faq-20057875

If you have any questions or concerns please email us at:

mydailychoiceasia@gmail.com

MY DAILY CHOICE BLOG

“SLEEP”

www.mydailychoice.com

VALERIAN OVERVIEW INFORMATION

Valerian is an herb. Medicine is made from the root.

Valerian is most commonly used for sleep disorders, especially the inability to sleep (insomnia). It is frequently combined with hops, lemon balm, or other herbs that also cause drowsiness. Some people who are trying to withdraw from the use of “sleeping pills” use valerian to help them sleep after they have tapered the dose of the sleeping pill. There is some scientific evidence that valerian works for sleep disorders, although not all studies are positive.

Valerian is also used for conditions connected to anxiety and psychological stress including nervous asthma, hysterical states, excitability, fear of illness (hypochondria),headachesmigraine, and stomach upset.

Some people use valerian for depression, mild tremors, epilepsy, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS).

Valerian is used for muscle and joint pain. Some women use valerian for menstrualcramps and symptoms associated with menopause, including hot flashes and anxiety.

Sometimes, valerian is added to bath water to help with restlessness and sleep disorders.

In manufacturing, the extracts and oil made from valerian are used as flavoring in foods and beverages.

How does it work?

Valerian seems to act like a sedative on the brain and nervous system.

http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-870-valerian.aspx?activeingredientid=870

If you have any questions or concerns please email us at:

mydailychoiceasia@gmail.com

 

MY DAILY CHOICE BLOG

“SLEEP”

www.mydailychoice.com

Valerian Benefits

Valerian is well known for its sedative qualities and its ability to relax the central nervous system and the smooth muscle groups. It has been used as a sleeping aid for hundreds of years especially when there is excitation or difficulty in falling to sleep due to nervousness. Over 120 chemical components are found in valerian and although a very complex herb, it has not been found to have any negative side effects with moderate use.

It is calming without exerting too sedative an effect and is practically non-addictive. It is a valuable treatment for insomnia, the sedative effect due to the valepotriates and the isovaleric acid.

At least two double-blind studies have demonstrated that valerian extract can significantly reduce the amount of time it takes people to fall asleep without changing the normal stages of sleep.

Documented research has noted a mild hypnotic action in both normal sleepers and insomniacs, indicated by a beneficial effect on sleep latency, wake-time after sleep, frequency of waking, nocturnal motor activity, inner restlessness and tension and quality of sleep. Sleepiness and dream recall the morning after were unaffected. The valepotriates have a regulatory effect on the autonomic nervous system; research suggests that they have a calming effect on agitated people but are also a stimulant in cases of fatigue.

Valerian is used in Europe as an antispasmodic, particularly for abdominal cramps due to nervousness and for uterine cramps and menstrual agitation. It helps relieve dysmenorrhoea and it can be of benefit in migraine and rheumatic pain. It may also be applied locally as a treatment for cramps and other muscle tensions.

Valerian is also used as a mild tranquilizer for people experiencing emotional stress, much as anti-anxiety drugs are prescribed and has been prescribed for exhaustion. Valerian has occasionally been tried as part of a program to take a patient off antidepressants or benzodiazepines, and is sometimes used as a muscle relaxant to treat pain.

Valerian does not impair driving ability and produces no morning hangover effect. It is a gentle relaxant and an effective sleep aid.

Millions of people have difficulty sleeping and the pharmaceutical industry has cashed in on the problem to the tune of billions of dollars. But herbal sleep aids can be as effective as the powerful prescription sedatives such as valium and other narcotic type drugs.

http://www.herbwisdom.com/herb-valerian.html

If you have any questions or concerns please email us at:

mydailychoiceasia@gmail.com

MY DAILY CHOICE BLOG

“Sleep”

www.mydailychoice.com

MELATONIN

New research indicates that melatonin does much more than help some people sleep better. Exciting studies show that melatonin’s multifaceted effects may improve treatment outcomes in cancer patients and extend their lives. Additional applications of melatonin include guarding the nervous system against degenerative diseases—such as Alzheimer’s disease and stroke—and preventing debilitating migraines.

Melatonin is secreted from the pineal gland deep inside the brain. For more than a quarter-century, scientists have been intrigued by melatonin’s ability to coordinate the body’s physiological rhythms that help set the brain’s biological clock.

The principal factor affecting melatonin is light, which inhibits the secretion of this hormone. Darkness has the opposite effect from light, resulting in signaling to the pineal gland to increase melatonin secretion. The normal cycles of melatonin production are altered due to factors including aging, medications, and light exposure at night. While the long-term health effects of disrupted melatonin secretion are not yet fully known, some scientists have suggested that years of working nights could lead to adverse effects—even cancer.

Fortunately, melatonin supplements can safely and effectively restore balance to the body’s circadian rhythm of this important hormone—helping achieve a restful night’s sleep and keeping your biological clock ticking throughout a long, healthy life span.

Neuroprotective Benefits

Melatonin is a powerful and versatile antioxidant produced within the body. Melatonin protects both lipids and proteins against damage, and can scavenge some of the most dangerous free radicals in the body—including hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide. Unlike other antioxidants, melatonin easily diffuses into all cells, and even crosses the blood-brain barrier to protect the delicate brain.1

Unfortunately, levels of naturally produced melatonin decline with advancing age, leaving older adults with limited antioxidant protection against conditions associated with oxidative stress, particularly neurodegenerative diseases.1 Supplementing with melatonin may thus help older adults enhance their antioxidant protection against some of the most ravaging diseases of aging, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and stroke.

Melatonin levels are particularly low in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Nearly half of affected individuals suffer from sleep disturbances and “sundowning”—increased confusion, agitation, and other symptoms in the afternoon and evening.2 Not surprisingly, melatonin supplementation benefits patients with Alzheimer’s disease by improving sleep and reducing late-day aggravation of symptoms. Melatonin has also been found to decrease cognitive deterioration in individuals with Alzheimer’s disease, possibly by protecting brain cells from the toxic protein, beta-amyloid.

http://www.lifeextension.com/magazine/2007/6/nu_melatonin/Page-01

If you have any questions or concerns please email us at:

mydailychoiceasia@gmail.com

 

MY DAILY CHOICE BLOG

“SLEEP”

www.mydailychoice.com

What is melatonin?

Melatonin is a hormone made by the pineal gland , a small gland in the brainMelatonin helps control your sleep and wake cycles. Very small amounts of it are found in foods such as meats, grains, fruits, and vegetables. You can also buy it as a supplement.

What does natural melatonin do in the body?

Your body has its own internal clock that controls your natural cycle of sleeping and waking hours. In part, your body clock controls how much melatonin your body makes. Normally, melatonin levels begin to rise in the mid- to late evening, remain high for most of the night, and then drop in the early morning hours.

Light affects how much melatonin your body produces. During the shorter days of the winter months, your body may produce melatonin either earlier or later in the day than usual. This change can lead to symptoms of seasonal affective disorder (SAD), or winter depression.

Natural melatonin levels slowly drop with age. Some older adults make very small amounts of it or none at all.

Why is melatonin used as a dietary supplement?

Melatonin supplements are sometimes used to treat jet lag or sleepproblems (insomnia). Scientists are also looking at other good uses for melatonin, such as:

Treating seasonal affective disorder (SAD).

Helping to control sleep patterns for people who work night shifts.

Preventing or reducing problems with sleeping and confusion after surgery.

Reducing chronic cluster headaches.

http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/tc/melatonin-overview

 

If you have any questions or concerns please email us at:

mydailychoiceasia@gmail.com

 MY DAILY CHOICE BLOG

“SLEEP”

www.mydailychoice.com

I read that the herbal supplement valerian can help you fall asleep if you have insomnia. Is valerian safe, and does it actually work?

Results from multiple studies indicate that valerian — a tall, flowering grassland plant — may reduce the amount of time it takes to fall asleep and help you sleep better. Of the many valerian species, only the carefully processed roots of the Valeriana officinalis have been widely studied. However, not all studies have shown valerian to be effective, and there may be some dangers.

Before you decide to take a valerian supplement for insomnia, consider the following:

Medication may not be the answer for insomnia. Cognitive behavioral therapy — for instance, replacing worries about not sleeping with positive thoughts — may be more effective and safer than medications for dealing with chronic insomnia. Or there may be important underlying causes, such as sleep apnea or periodic limb movement disorder, which require evaluation.

Product claims may be misleading. Don’t just rely on a product’s biased marketing. Look for objective, research-based information to evaluate a product’s claims, such as from the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) or the Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS). Both NCCIH and ODS are part of the National Institutes of Health.

Dosage is unclear. Valerian seems to be most effective after you take it regularly for two or more weeks. Because dosages varied in studies involving valerian and some studies weren’t rigorous, it’s not clear what dose is most effective or for how long you should take a particular dose.

Possible side effects exist. Although valerian is thought to be fairly safe, side effects such as headache, dizziness, stomach problems or sleeplessness may occur. Valerian may not be safe if you’re pregnant or breast-feeding. And it has not been evaluated to determine if it’s safe for children under 3 years old. If you have liver disease, avoid taking valerian. And because valerian can make you drowsy, avoid driving or operating dangerous machinery after taking it.

Drug interactions are possible. Valerian may increase the effects of other sleep aids. It also increases the sedative effect of depressants, such as alcohol, benzodiazepines and narcotics. Valerian can interfere with some prescription medications. And it may interact with other dietary supplements, such as St. John’s wort. If you’re thinking of taking valerian, check with your doctor to make sure it won’t interact with other medications or supplements you’re taking.

Ultimately, persistent insomnia indicates a problem, such as poor sleep habits or a medical or psychological condition. If you continue to have insomnia, talk to your doctor about possible causes and treatment strategies. Or, consider getting an evaluation at a sleep medicine center that’s accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/insomnia/expert-answers/valerian/faq-20057875

If you have any questions or concerns please email us at:

mydailychoiceasia@gmail.com

MY DAILY CHOICE BLOG

“SLEEP”

www.mydailychoice.com

VALERIAN OVERVIEW INFORMATION

Valerian is an herb. Medicine is made from the root.

Valerian is most commonly used for sleep disorders, especially the inability to sleep (insomnia). It is frequently combined with hops, lemon balm, or other herbs that also cause drowsiness. Some people who are trying to withdraw from the use of “sleeping pills” use valerian to help them sleep after they have tapered the dose of the sleeping pill. There is some scientific evidence that valerian works for sleep disorders, although not all studies are positive.

Valerian is also used for conditions connected to anxiety and psychological stress including nervous asthma, hysterical states, excitability, fear of illness (hypochondria),headachesmigraine, and stomach upset.

Some people use valerian for depression, mild tremors, epilepsy, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS).

Valerian is used for muscle and joint pain. Some women use valerian for menstrualcramps and symptoms associated with menopause, including hot flashes and anxiety.

Sometimes, valerian is added to bath water to help with restlessness and sleep disorders.

In manufacturing, the extracts and oil made from valerian are used as flavoring in foods and beverages.

How does it work?

Valerian seems to act like a sedative on the brain and nervous system.

http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-870-valerian.aspx?activeingredientid=870

If you have any questions or concerns please email us at:

mydailychoiceasia@gmail.com

 

MY DAILY CHOICE BLOG

“SLEEP”

www.mydailychoice.com

Valerian Benefits

Valerian is well known for its sedative qualities and its ability to relax the central nervous system and the smooth muscle groups. It has been used as a sleeping aid for hundreds of years especially when there is excitation or difficulty in falling to sleep due to nervousness. Over 120 chemical components are found in valerian and although a very complex herb, it has not been found to have any negative side effects with moderate use.

It is calming without exerting too sedative an effect and is practically non-addictive. It is a valuable treatment for insomnia, the sedative effect due to the valepotriates and the isovaleric acid.

At least two double-blind studies have demonstrated that valerian extract can significantly reduce the amount of time it takes people to fall asleep without changing the normal stages of sleep.

Documented research has noted a mild hypnotic action in both normal sleepers and insomniacs, indicated by a beneficial effect on sleep latency, wake-time after sleep, frequency of waking, nocturnal motor activity, inner restlessness and tension and quality of sleep. Sleepiness and dream recall the morning after were unaffected. The valepotriates have a regulatory effect on the autonomic nervous system; research suggests that they have a calming effect on agitated people but are also a stimulant in cases of fatigue.

Valerian is used in Europe as an antispasmodic, particularly for abdominal cramps due to nervousness and for uterine cramps and menstrual agitation. It helps relieve dysmenorrhoea and it can be of benefit in migraine and rheumatic pain. It may also be applied locally as a treatment for cramps and other muscle tensions.

Valerian is also used as a mild tranquilizer for people experiencing emotional stress, much as anti-anxiety drugs are prescribed and has been prescribed for exhaustion. Valerian has occasionally been tried as part of a program to take a patient off antidepressants or benzodiazepines, and is sometimes used as a muscle relaxant to treat pain.

Valerian does not impair driving ability and produces no morning hangover effect. It is a gentle relaxant and an effective sleep aid.

Millions of people have difficulty sleeping and the pharmaceutical industry has cashed in on the problem to the tune of billions of dollars. But herbal sleep aids can be as effective as the powerful prescription sedatives such as valium and other narcotic type drugs.

http://www.herbwisdom.com/herb-valerian.html

If you have any questions or concerns please email us at:

mydailychoiceasia@gmail.com

MY DAILY CHOICE BLOG

“Sleep”

www.mydailychoice.com

MELATONIN

New research indicates that melatonin does much more than help some people sleep better. Exciting studies show that melatonin’s multifaceted effects may improve treatment outcomes in cancer patients and extend their lives. Additional applications of melatonin include guarding the nervous system against degenerative diseases—such as Alzheimer’s disease and stroke—and preventing debilitating migraines.

Melatonin is secreted from the pineal gland deep inside the brain. For more than a quarter-century, scientists have been intrigued by melatonin’s ability to coordinate the body’s physiological rhythms that help set the brain’s biological clock.

The principal factor affecting melatonin is light, which inhibits the secretion of this hormone. Darkness has the opposite effect from light, resulting in signaling to the pineal gland to increase melatonin secretion. The normal cycles of melatonin production are altered due to factors including aging, medications, and light exposure at night. While the long-term health effects of disrupted melatonin secretion are not yet fully known, some scientists have suggested that years of working nights could lead to adverse effects—even cancer.

Fortunately, melatonin supplements can safely and effectively restore balance to the body’s circadian rhythm of this important hormone—helping achieve a restful night’s sleep and keeping your biological clock ticking throughout a long, healthy life span.

Neuroprotective Benefits

Melatonin is a powerful and versatile antioxidant produced within the body. Melatonin protects both lipids and proteins against damage, and can scavenge some of the most dangerous free radicals in the body—including hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide. Unlike other antioxidants, melatonin easily diffuses into all cells, and even crosses the blood-brain barrier to protect the delicate brain.1

Unfortunately, levels of naturally produced melatonin decline with advancing age, leaving older adults with limited antioxidant protection against conditions associated with oxidative stress, particularly neurodegenerative diseases.1 Supplementing with melatonin may thus help older adults enhance their antioxidant protection against some of the most ravaging diseases of aging, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and stroke.

Melatonin levels are particularly low in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Nearly half of affected individuals suffer from sleep disturbances and “sundowning”—increased confusion, agitation, and other symptoms in the afternoon and evening.2 Not surprisingly, melatonin supplementation benefits patients with Alzheimer’s disease by improving sleep and reducing late-day aggravation of symptoms. Melatonin has also been found to decrease cognitive deterioration in individuals with Alzheimer’s disease, possibly by protecting brain cells from the toxic protein, beta-amyloid.

http://www.lifeextension.com/magazine/2007/6/nu_melatonin/Page-01

If you have any questions or concerns please email us at:

mydailychoiceasia@gmail.com